Call for Project Presentations

The review process for the Call for Project Presentations has ended. Overall, we received 57 submissions. Due to the high amount of excellent abstracts, we decided that the 10 most outstanding proposals will be presented as lightening talks and as posters. Furthermore, 10 additional contributions of high quality will be presented as posters (without lightning talk), see conference programme.

All abstracts have been reviewed by a review board (see below) based on the following reviewers criteria – rating from 1 (very low/poor) to 5 (very high/good):

  • Relevance for the conference topic -> Topic
  • Practical relevance of the application/projects (implementation status, sustainability, and openness) -> Practical
  • Innovative and scientific relevance -> Innovative
  • Overall recommendation -> Overall

Accepted contributions of the Open Science Conference 2017

Following is the list of all accepted contributions of the Open Science Conference 2017 including a scientific justification for their acceptance based on the reviewers’ comments. The shown rating values are the average of three independent reviews.

1. DeepGreen: Prototyping an efficient technical implementation of the open access components included in the Alliance licenses
Julia Alexandra Goltz1, Kaja Scheliga2
1Cooperative Library Network Berlin-Brandenburg (KOBV)
2Helmholtz Association, Helmholtz Open Science Coordination Office

The DeepGreen project is a project of enormous impact and its implementation is of high relevance as it can lead to a significant increase of publications that will be accessible via the green open access way. The idea is to reduce the effort required of authors to make their articles available open access by a data hub where publishers deposit publications which in turn are routed to eligible repositories via defined interfaces. The project will make the developed solutions openly accessible, reusable, and scalable. Thus, the project makes an important contribution to support open access to knowledge.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 4,67; Practical = 4,33; Innovative = 5,00; Overall = 5,00

2. Integrating Open Science Practices into the Research Process in Psychology
Erich Weichselgartner1, Ronny Bölter1,  Martin Kerwer1
1Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID)

The smart assistant called DataWiz is highly relevant for the field of research data management, because it offers basic support for Open Science practices, namely management, documentation, archiving, and sharing of research data. DataWiz aims to minimize the effort of the single researcher and thus fosters Open Science practices at the individual level.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 5,00; Practical = 4,67; Innovative = 4,33; Overall = 4,67

3. Learning about Text and Data Mining, the Future of Open Science 
Martine Oudenhoven1,  Nancy Pontika2
1LIBER / OpenMinTeD
2Open University / OpenMinTeD

The European project OpenMinTeD aims to provide a platform to generally make open science content more mineable by applying text and data mining (TDM) methods. TDM on scientific papers remains a challenging and fruitful endeavor. Thus, OpenMinTeD is a very important project for the conference as data mining is one key point in the discussion about open access and retrieval.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 4,67; Practical = 4,67; Innovative = 4,00; Overall =  4,33

4. Opening reproducible research (o2r)
Markus Konkol1,  Daniel Nüst1, Marc Schutzeichel1, Edzer Pebesma1Christian Kray1Holger Przibytzin1Jörg Lorenz1
1University of Münster

The authors present the Opening Reproducible Research project (o2r), addressing computational reproducible research in geosciences. The aim is to enable researchers to re-run the computational steps described in a scientific publication and, by this, to encourage researchers in submitting and executing reproducible research. Reproducibility is one of the main challenges for the upcoming years.  There are few (technical) solutions for small-scale replications to handle that issue. Thus, the project perfectly addresses the overall scope of the conference.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 4,33; Practical = 4,00; Innovative = 4,67; Overall = 4,67

5. Open Web-based Learning (OWL) – Space for Professional Development of Adult Educators 
Kolja Philipp Debus1Sabine Schöb2Tim Scholze1
1German Institute for Adult Education – Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning (DIE)
2Department of Further Education, University of Tuebingen

The authors describe the interesting open web platform OWL / EULE that is based on current psycho-pedagogical models and offers a flexible application in different learning contexts. The project has a wide scope in the field of adult education, and seems methodologically well grounded. Furthermore, OWL / EULE also enables research on its application and thus, provides the basis for future extensions and improvements.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 4,00; Practical = 4,67; Innovative = 4,33; Overall = 4,33

6. Continuous quality control for research data: results of a first experiment
Vidya Ayer1, Christian Pietsch2Johanna Vompras2, Jochen Schirrwagen2Cord Wiljes1Vitali Peil2Philipp Cimiano1
1CITEC, Bielefeld University
2Bielefeld University Library

The project Conquaire aims at the development of an infrastructure architecture that helps sharing data by accessing them, reusing, reproducing results and ensuring their quality. The success of the Conquaire quality control framework is evaluated by a set of experiments. The proposal seems to be interesting and valuable for the community, because reproducibility is an important topic in Open Science and requires new solutions.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 4,33; Practical = 4,33; Innovative = 4,33; Overall = 4,33

7. OpenAIRE: Opening Peer Review
Tony Ross-Hellauer1, Birgit Schmidt1, Arvid Deppe1
1University of Goettingen / OpenAIRE

OpenAIRE, the European digital infrastructure for open scholarship, is a sociotechnical initiative that includes also the investigation of new models of peer reviews to literature and beyond. In this context, the proposal describes a workflow towards Open Science and best practices. The contribution draws on a variety of materials which makes its insights potentially rich. It is a promising, and interesting contribution that builds on a large user base and a solid number of test users.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 4,33; Practical = 4,33; Innovative = 4,33; Overall = 4,00

8. OER meets OPEN Science
Thomas Köhler1,2Sandra Hofhues3Claudia Bremer4Andrea Gumpert2Jörg Hafer5Klaus Himpsl-Gutermann6
1Media Centre / Technical University Dresden
2Technical University Dresden
3University of Cologne
4studiumdigitale, Goethe University Frankfurt
5University of Potsdam
6Pädagogische Hochschule Wien

The contribution discusses the duality between open teaching and open research. The authors argue from a comprehensive media-didactic, educational scientific, and research methodological perspective. The discussion is illustrated by four practical projects. Thus, the contribution targets not only a highly relevant issue of Open Science and OER but also delivers practical insights.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 5,00; Practical = 3,67; Innovative = 4,00; Overall = 4,33

9. Educational Data Package. A Pilot Project at the German Research Data Centre for Higher Education Research and Science Studies
Karsten Stephan1Daniel Buck1Benedikt Kretzmeyer1
1German Centre for Higher Education Research and Science Studies (DZHW)

The presented project aims to combine a publication with underlying research data (Campus Use Files/CUF), documentation, and scripts into a so called Educational Data Package (EDP). These EDP are used in university education to teach students good scientific practices and to train them for careers in science and research. This is a very interesting idea and also a commendable effort towards reproducible research.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 4,67; Practical = 4; Innovative = 3,67; Overall = 4,67

10. EarthServer-2: Agile Datacube Analytics
Peter Baumann1Angelo Pio Rossi1Vlad Merticariu1
1Jacobs University

The abstract presents the very interesting project EarthServer from earth science to utilize existing geospatial data. The developed datacube technology is based on open standards and was already successfully tested in different application scenarios dealing with up to petabyte data volumes. It might be a good example also for other scientific disciplines.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 4,33; Practical = 4,00; Innovative = 4,33; Overall = 4,00

11. wb-web – an open information and networking platform for continuing educators
Regina Kahle1, Carmen Biel1
1German Institute for Adult Education – Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning (DIE)

The authors describe the web platform wb-web which offers valuable information (such as research results, publications, trends, discussions) in the area of continuing education. Almost all content of the platform is published under a CC-BY-SA-license and by this available as Open Educational Resources in order to allow re-use and re-design of the materials. To enhance this, the platform provides services for networking and exchanging knowledge. Overall, the project has yielded an innovative repository which perfectly addresses the topic of the conference.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 4,33; Practical = 4,67; Innovative = 3,33; Overall = 4,33

12. OER-Info
Ingo Blees1Axel Kühnlenz1Marc Rittberger1
1German Institute for International Educational Research (DIPF)

The project OER-Info aims to build a promising platform that provides information and facilitates knowledge transfer and networking around Open Educational Resources (OER).  OER are highly relevant and gained political traction in the recent years. Thus, it is a very interesting and relevant project for OER and the presenters will have valuable insights that are of practical value for the community.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 4,67; Practical = 4,33; Innovative = 3,33; Overall = 4,00

13. Teaching Good, Open Science by Conducting Close Replications in the Classroom 
Lorne Campbell1
1University of Western Ontario

The contribution combines Open Science with the highly relevant discussion about replication studies and good practice in science. The hands-on replication project teaches students at very early stage quality standards of good practice. It encourages replication research in young scholars from an open science perspective and thus, offers a fruitful basis for the education of a new open and critical generation of researchers.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 4,33; Practical = 4,33; Innovative = 3,33; Overall = 4,33

14. Survey: Open Science in Higher Education
Ina Blümel1,3Tamara Heck2Lambert Heller3, Athanasios Mazarakis4,5Isabella Peters4,5Ansgar Scherp4,5Luzian Weisel6
1University of Applied Sciences and Arts Hannover
2Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf
3German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB)
4Leibniz Information Centre for Economics (ZBW)
5Kiel University
6FIZ Karlsruhe – Leibniz Institute for Information Infrastructure (FIZ KA)

The presented survey targets the acceptance and application of Open Science methods and tools. The topics for the planned survey cover a broad variety of issues including different forms of online collaboration and competence in Open Science practices. The survey has the potential to yield interesting insights covering different subjects and disciplines.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 5,00; Practical = 3,67; Innovative = 3,33; Overall = 4,00

15. Opening up the research lifecycle: review, assessment and dissemination of scholarly publications
Edit Gorogh1Eleni Toli2Peter Kraker3
1Göttingen State and University Library
2Athena Research and Innovation Center
3Know-Center

The described project OpenUp aims to develop and examine new innovate and novel methods for scholarly review, dissemination, and assessment of scholarly publications in the context of Open Science. The project is very interesting and ambitious, it promises a wide range of new insights in the field of Open Science and thus fits well with the conference topics.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 4,33; Practical = 4,00; Innovative = 3,33; Overall = 4,33

16. Increasing Access, Promoting Progress: Empowering Global Research through the BHL
Martin R. Kalfatovic1Carolyn A. Sheffield1, Grace Costantino1
1Biodiversity Heritage Library / Smithsonian Libraries

The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) is an international consortium with the objective to provide open access to biodiversity literature. Due to more than 10 years’ experience, BHL has already gained significant impact in the biodiversity community, which may also be interesting for other scientific disciplines. The project also shows the relevance of the library and information infrastructure community in the Open Science movement.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 4,00; Practical =  4,33; Innovative = 3,33; Overall = 4,00

17. Opening Scholarly Communication in Social Sciences by Connecting Collaborative Authoring to Peer Review

Philipp Mayr1,  Fakhri Momeni1Afshin Sadeghi2, Christoph Lange2
1
GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences
2University of Bonn

The contribution proposes a project called OSCOSS (Open Scholarly Communication in Social Sciences) which intends to develop a collaborative writing environment throughout the publication process by involving different types of users such as: authors, reviewers and readers. The system is illustrated by different use cases and their functionalities and thus, provides a broad variety of examples. The described system aims not only at an alternative publication process, but also tries to foster Open Access and reusability.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 4,00; Practical = 4,00; Innovative = 3,67; Overall = 4,00

18. Open Knowledge Maps: A Visual Interface to the World’s Scientific Knowledge
Peter Kraker1Asura Enkhbayar1Maxi Schramm2Christopher Kittel3Scott Chamberlain4Mike Skaug4Björn Brembs5
1Know-Center
2Open Knowledge Austria
3rOpenSci
4National Snow and Ice Data Center
5Universität Regensburg

The authors describe the web platform Open Knowledge Maps for exploring and discovering huge amount of scholarly content by interactive knowledge maps which discover and visualize the main areas of a field and highlight relationships between different areas. The focus of the project is to provide a large-scale system of open and interlinked knowledge maps for all fields of research. The visual representation of “scientific world knowledge” is a nice and innovative idea. Both, the approach and the implementation, look appealing.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 4,00; Practical = 3,33; Innovative = 4,33; Overall = 4,00

19. OceanTEA: A Platform for Sharing Oceanographic Data and Analyses
Arne Johanson1Reiner Jung1Sascha Flögel2Wolf-Christian Dullo2Wilhelm Hasselbring1
1Software Engineering Group, Kiel University
2GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research

The focus of the project for sharing oceanographic data and analyses lies on  exploring and analyzing high-dimensional datasets interactively and collaboratively. Furthermore, it aims at providing interactive access to research results and supporting scientists in their publication efforts. Thus, the proposal describes not only a very interesting use case of OER, but also addresses the important issue of data sharing.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 4,00; Practical = 3,67; Innovative = 3,67; Overall = 4,00

20. IRUS-UK: on the road to Open Metrics

Pete Dalton1Hilary Jones2Jo Lambert2Ross MacIntyre2Paul Needham3Laura Wong2
1Evidence Base
2Jisc
3Cranfield University

The IRUS-UK (Institutional Repository Usage Statistics UK) project is an interesting case study towards robust, transparent, and replicable metrics based on the COUNTER standard. The project fits well to the conference topics as the assessability of scientific impact with novel metrics is an important research topic in the context of Open Science.

Abstract
Reviewers ratings: Topic = 3,67; Practical = 4,33; Innovative = 3,33; Overall = 4,00

 

Review Board

  • Ingo Blees, German Institute for International Educational Research (DIPF)
  • Ina Blümel, German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB) / University of Applied Sciences Hannover
  • Benedikt Fecher, German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin) / Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society
  • Konrad Förstner, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg
  • Sascha Friesike, Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society
  • Michael Granitzer, University of Passau
  • Tamara Heck, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf
  • Christian Pieter Hoffmann, University of Leipzig
  • Robert Jäschke, The University of Sheffield & L3S Research Center
  • Alexandra Jobmann, Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN)
  • Puneet Kishor, Independent Open Science Advocate
  • Peter Kraker, Know-Center
  • Atif Latif, ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
  • Stephanie Linek, ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
  • Natalia Manola Athena, Research and Innovation Centre
  • Athanasios Mazarakis, Kiel University & ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
  • Peter Mutschke, GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences (GESIS)
  • Kaltrina Nuredini, ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
  • Isabella Peters, Kiel University & ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
  • Tamara Pianos, ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
  • Kaja Scheliga, Helmholtz Association
  • Ansgar Scherp, Kiel University & ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
  • Guido Scherp, ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
  • Willi Scholz, ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
  • Kendra Sticht, University of Münster
  • Sonja Utz, Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM)
  • Elisabeth Vogler, German Institute for International Educational Research (DIPF)