OPEN SCIENCE
CONFERENCE
Register now 08-10 March 2022 | #osc2022

WHERE
Online Conference
WHEN
08-10 March 2022
HASHTAG
#osc2022

Open Science Conference 2022

The registration for the Open Science Conference 2022 is now open. If you want to attend the UNESCO Workshop „Fostering Open Science in Africa – Practices, Opportunities, Solutions“ (see conference programme), please use the ticket type „Open Science Conference including UNESCO Workshop“.

The Open Science Conference 2022 is the 9th international conference of the Leibniz Research Alliance Open Science. The annual conference is dedicated to the Open Science movement and provides a unique forum for researchers, librarians, practitioners, infrastructure providers, policy makers, and other important stakeholders to discuss the latest and future developments in Open Science.

The conference offers insights into both practical and technical innovations that serve the implementation of open practices as well as current and pioneering developments in the global Open Science movement. Such developments are, for example, the increasing plea for open practices as lessons learned from global crises as well as recent discussions on the relation of Open Science and knowledge equity. Furthermore, the conference offers many opportunities for networking and exchange.

This year’s conference is cooperating with the German Comission for UNESCO. They organise a panel discussion and a workshop in the context of the recently adopted UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science.

Barcamp Open Science

The Barcamp Open Science is a pre-event of the Open Science Conference. It takes place on 7 March 2022 (online) and is open to everybody interested in discussing, learning more about, and sharing experiences on practices in Open Science. Find out more here.

Conference Programme

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  • Day 1

    March 08, 2022 (CET)

  • The presentation provides the framework of activities of the Science Cluster Projects in the project EOSC Future. Five Science Clusters come with ten Science Projects which target to current societal challenges (e.g. COVID-19 and Climate Change impacts) and implement a multidisciplinary and cross-domain approach by taking part in the making and using the next-generation Infrastructure of EOSC. This approach attempts to bring down current barriers between scientific disciplines and domains and bring different scientific communities to work together by using the new attributes of the EOSC Infrastructure. The challenges, practices and solutions theses Science Projects are facing are discussed.

  • Open Science is an attempt to make science contribute more to tackling major societal challenges. To achieve this grand ambition, public stakeholders and citizens should be involved with science in a meaningful way. We have examined 1) when public engagement can be considered meaningful and, 2) how it can be organised.

    Although there is not one optimal way to involve the public meaningfully, this does not mean that any public engagement is by definition meaningful. Our research culminates in the position that public involvement is meaningful when the (power) relationship between knowledge producers and stakeholders changes in favour of the latter. This means that for public engagement to be meaningful, its form must fit well with its aim; the purpose of engaging the public suggests who should be engaged, where, when, and how. Additionally, we present five directives to help policymakers and researchers design processes of meaningful public engagement.

  • Open Science means opening up science through transparency in the research process and participation of new actors in research and innovation. Many research performing organisations (RPOs) are interested in or have already set out to strengthen Open Science at their institution. To facilitate top-down engagement from institutional leaders and culture change we are currently developing Road2Openness (R2O). R2O is a web-based assessment tool that helps institutions to evaluate their current Open Science activities and supports them with recommendations for a strategic opening to develop institutional training, infrastructure and incentive systems for Open Science. We have partnered with three universities in Germany to co-develop and pilot the tool. In this talk, we will present the idea behind the tool, how it can be used by RPOs and the results from the pilot project.

  • 1. Promoting and Educating on Citizen Science in the Context of a Small Central European Country: The Case of Slovakia.
    Zuzana Stožická1, Silvia Sofianos1, Mária Habrmanová1, Matej Harvát1, Jitka Dobbersteinová1
    Organization(s): 1: Slovak Centre of Scientific and Technical Information
    Abstract

    2. Semantic Metadata Annotation Service
    Julia Sasse1,Johannes Darms1, Juliane Fluck1,2
    Organization(s): 1: ZB MED – Information Centre for Life Sciences, Cologne, Bonn, Germany; 2: University of Bonn, Germany
    Abstract

    3. IIIF collections as Research Data - an Integrated Approach by the Zentralbibliothek Zürich
    Elisabeth-Christine Gamer1, Elias Kreyenbühl1
    Organization(s): 1: Zentralbibliothek Zürich
    Abstract

    4. Student Involvement in Open Science
    Iris Smal1, Hilbrand Wouters2, Christeen Saparamadu3
    Organization(s): 1: University of Amsterdam; 2: Utrecht University; 3: Technological University Dublin
    Abstract

    5. Open Energy Metadata: Publishing Energy Data Enriched with Ontology References
    Christian Hofmann1, Hannah Förster2, Ludwig Hülk1
    Organization(s): 1: Reiner Lemoine Institut; 2: Öko-Institut
    Abstract

    6. A Road to Data Liberation in Helmholtz
    Christine Lemster1, Constanze Curdt1, Sören Lorenz1
    Organization(s): 1: Geomar, Helmholtz Metadata Collaboration
    Abstract

    7. French Second National Plan for Open Science: Support and Opportunities for Universities’ Open Infrastructures and Practices.
    Sophie Forcadell2, Adeline Rege1
    Organization(s): 1: University of Strasbourg; 2: SciencesPo
    Abstract

    8. The First 6 Months of Open Science
    Lynnee Marie Argabright1, Allison Michelle Kittinger1
    Organization(s): 1: UNC-Wilmington
    Abstract

    9. Handling Machine-generated Statistics in Open Repositories
    Tal Ayalon1
    Organization(s): 1: World Bank Group
    Abstract

    10. Open Access in Greece: Perceptions in Academic Institutions
    Maria Frantzi1, Athanasia Salamoura2, Giannis Tsakonas1
    Organization(s): 1: Library & Information Center, University of Patras, Greece; 2: HEAL-Link, Scholarly Communication Unit, Greece
    Abstract

    11. How the Promotion Campaign Can Raise Awareness of the Open Access among Academics: The Case at the School of Economics and Business, University of Ljubljana
    Matic Bradač1
    Organization(s): 1: University of Ljubljana, School of Economics and Business (SEB LU)

    12. Reflecting Open Practices on Digital Infrastructures
    Johannes Hiebl1, Tamara Heck1, Sylvia Kullmann1, Marc Rittberger1
    Organization(s): 1: DIPF | Leibniz Institute for Research and Information in Education
    Abstract

    13. Improving Community Funding and Workflows for Scholar-led Journals and Blogs
    Marcel Wrzesinski1, Philipp Hess2
    Organization(s): 1: Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society; 2: Knowledge Unlatched
    Abstract


    More information about the accepted and presented contributions can be found here.


  • Day 2

    March 09, 2022 (CET)

  • In recent years, major academic publishers have begun to redesign their business model, shifting from traditional publishing to a data analytics business. Personal and behavioural data of the researches is collected through site tracking, authentication systems and real-time data, allowing the publishers to create detailed profiles of research behaviour, often without sufficient knowledge on the part of researchers and institutions. This lecture illustrates the impact that the tracking of individual researches can have on academic freedom and the right to informational self-determination. It is an appeal to academic institutions to protect sensitive data and engage in the debate on research tracking.

  • The contribution will present the concept of a new form of open scientific publication that has the potential to transform the current publication system through putting a focus on updating existing publications, rather than closing them after their first appearance. It is currently based on review-type articles that discuss major new developments and/or political topics. But the concept can also be extended to any type of scientific publication.

  • For over a decade, the European scientific community has been battling for redefining the copyright framework to make it more adapted for data-intensive research. In an effort to address this issue, EU Directive 2019/790 on copyright in the Digital Single Market introduced an exception for Text and Data Mining (TDM) for the purposes of scientific research; the text has recently been transposed or is in the process of transposition in the national laws of EU Member States. While the new exception does facilitate TDM by research organisations, it can also be criticised for its limited list of beneficiaries, for the uncertainties surrounding data archiving and sharing, or for its unclear relation with technological protection measures that can be implemented by content owners. Perhaps most importantly, however, the exception can disincentivise open licensing of research data, a precondition of Open Science.

    In this talk, the author will present the content of the new TDM exception for scientific research in the EU, discuss its potentially negative impact on Open Science and suggest institutional strategies to prevent it from materialising.

  • Humanity has a mix of overlapping goals that relate to science (and more broadly, wissenschaft). We seek new knowledge for its own purpose as well as for its potential solution to both detailed and general problems, situations, and crises. And we want to be able to verify (or disprove) such knowledge (reproducibility), then build on it (reuse), as simply and as cost-effectively as possible. In this talk, I will focus on knowledge captured in research software, which can be both read, executed, and extended. Specifically, we have developed a new set of FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable) Principles for Research Software, which serve an overlapping purpose with open science. This talk will incude: the role of software in research, the FAIR for Research Software Principles, the community that developed them, the next steps in their implementation, and systematic challenges that need to be addressed for software to be more FAIR and for it to better help meet humanity's science goals.

  • 1. Promoting and Educating on Citizen Science in the Context of a Small Central European Country: The Case of Slovakia.
    Zuzana Stožická1, Silvia Sofianos1, Mária Habrmanová1, Matej Harvát1, Jitka Dobbersteinová1
    Organization(s): 1: Slovak Centre of Scientific and Technical Information
    Abstract

    2. Semantic Metadata Annotation Service
    Julia Sasse1,Johannes Darms1, Juliane Fluck1,2
    Organization(s): 1: ZB MED – Information Centre for Life Sciences, Cologne, Bonn, Germany; 2: University of Bonn, Germany
    Abstract

    3. IIIF collections as Research Data - an Integrated Approach by the Zentralbibliothek Zürich
    Elisabeth-Christine Gamer1, Elias Kreyenbühl1
    Organization(s): 1: Zentralbibliothek Zürich
    Abstract

    4. Student Involvement in Open Science
    Iris Smal1, Hilbrand Wouters2, Christeen Saparamadu3
    Organization(s): 1: University of Amsterdam; 2: Utrecht University; 3: Technological University Dublin
    Abstract

    5. Open Energy Metadata: Publishing Energy Data Enriched with Ontology References
    Christian Hofmann1, Hannah Förster2, Ludwig Hülk1
    Organization(s): 1: Reiner Lemoine Institut; 2: Öko-Institut
    Abstract

    6. A Road to Data Liberation in Helmholtz
    Christine Lemster1, Constanze Curdt1, Sören Lorenz1
    Organization(s): 1: Geomar, Helmholtz Metadata Collaboration
    Abstract

    7. French Second National Plan for Open Science: Support and Opportunities for Universities’ Open Infrastructures and Practices.
    Sophie Forcadell2, Adeline Rege1
    Organization(s): 1: University of Strasbourg; 2: SciencesPo
    Abstract

    8. The First 6 Months of Open Science
    Lynnee Marie Argabright1, Allison Michelle Kittinger1
    Organization(s): 1: UNC-Wilmington
    Abstract

    9. Handling Machine-generated Statistics in Open Repositories
    Tal Ayalon1
    Organization(s): 1: World Bank Group
    Abstract

    10. Open Access in Greece: Perceptions in Academic Institutions
    Maria Frantzi1, Athanasia Salamoura2, Giannis Tsakonas1
    Organization(s): 1: Library & Information Center, University of Patras, Greece; 2: HEAL-Link, Scholarly Communication Unit, Greece
    Abstract

    11. How the Promotion Campaign Can Raise Awareness of the Open Access among Academics: The Case at the School of Economics and Business, University of Ljubljana
    Matic Bradač1
    Organization(s): 1: University of Ljubljana, School of Economics and Business (SEB LU)

    12. Reflecting Open Practices on Digital Infrastructures
    Johannes Hiebl1, Tamara Heck1, Sylvia Kullmann1, Marc Rittberger1
    Organization(s): 1: DIPF | Leibniz Institute for Research and Information in Education
    Abstract

    13. Improving Community Funding and Workflows for Scholar-led Journals and Blogs
    Marcel Wrzesinski1, Philipp Hess2
    Organization(s): 1: Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society; 2: Knowledge Unlatched
    Abstract


    More information about the accepted and presented contributions can be found here.


  • Day 3

    March 10, 2022 (CET)

  • Whilst many funders and publishers require or encourage researchers to share data underlying publications, the same cannot be said for code, which is also vital for reproducibility and transparency of research. We surveyed researchers in computational biology disciplines to understand if the community would support a mandatory code sharing policy, and their experiences with code sharing. Respondents (n=214) reported that, on average, 71% of their research articles have associated code, and that on average, code has not been shared for 32% of these articles. The most common reasons for not sharing code were practical issues (e.g. lack of time) and intellectual property concerns were cited by 22%. Overall, respondents reported they were on average more likely to submit to the journal if it had a mandatory code sharing policy, although Medicine and Health scientists and senior researchers viewed the proposed policy less favourably. A stronger code sharing policy has since been introduced at PLOS Computational Biology and this talk will discuss the learnings from the survey and the impact of the stronger code sharing policy implemented at the journal.

  • This talk will summarise work done within the EC Horizon2020 project ON-MERRIT (2019-2022, https://on-merrit.eu/) to investigate risks of cumulative advantage in the transition to Open Science. Open Science holds the promise to make scientific endeavours more inclusive, participatory, understandable, accessible, and re-usable for large audiences. However, making processes open will not per se drive wide re-use or participation unless also accompanied by the capacity (in terms of knowledge, skills, financial resources, technological readiness and motivation) to do so. These capacities vary considerably across regions, institutions and demographics. Those advantaged by such factors will remain potentially privileged, putting Open Science’s agenda of inclusivity at risk of propagating conditions of “cumulative advantage”. Since 2019, the EC Horizon2020 project ON-MERRIT has been investigating these issues using scientometric, sociological and other approaches to examine how these factor influence the ways in which Open Science is taken up (and by whom). As ON-MERRIT concludes, this talk will showcase diverse findings across areas including OA publishing, rewards and incentives and participatory methods. I then concludes by presenting recommendations to mitigate threats co-created with the Open Science community.

  • N.N.

  • The workshop is organized by the German Comission for UNESCO. It aims to share practical experiences on key success factors for Open Science in Africa. The participants will be invited to report on practical examples. The number of participants is limited to 60. Please use the ticket type "Open Science Conference including UNESCO Workshop" during registration if you want to participate.

    A detailed workshop description can be found here.

    For questions about the workshop, please contact Fatma Rebeggiani (Rebeggiani@unesco.de).

Conference Speakers and Panellists

Programme Committee

  • Thomas Köhler, Technical University Dresden
  • Stephanie Linek, Leibniz Information Centre for Economics (ZBW)
  • Peter Mutschke, GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences
  • Marc Rittberger, Leibniz Institute for Research and Information in Education (DIPF)
  • Klaus Tochtermann, Leibniz Information Centre for Economics (ZBW)
  • Andreas Witt, Leibniz Institute for the German Language (IDS)