About The Open Science Conference

About the Open Science Conference

The Open Science Conference 2020 is the 7th international conference of the Leibniz Research Alliance Open Science. The annual conference is dedicated to the Open Science movement and provides a unique forum for researchers, librarians, practitioners, infrastructure providers, policy makers, and other important stakeholders to discuss the latest and future developments in Open Science.

The conference addresses topics around Open Science such as:

  • Innovations to support open science practices and their application and acceptance in scientific communities
  • Scientific benefit of open science practices and their impact in society
  • Open science education and science communication to the broad public

Confirmed Speakers

  • Hugo Sven van Ewijk, Rathenau Instituut, Netherlands
  • Dr Johannes Fournier, German Research Foundation  / Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), Germany
  • Dr Emma Harris, Training Developer and Project Manager | Communications Team (MDC) and ORION project, Germany
  • Dr Henriikka Mustajoki, Federation of Finnish Learned Societies, Finland
  • Dr Julia Stewart Lowndes PhD. Senior Fellow and Director of Openscapes at the National Center for Ecological Analysis & Synthesis (NCEAS), USA
  • Dr August Wierling, Western Norway University of Applied Science, Norway

WHERE
H4 Hotel,
Berlin, Germany
WHEN
11-12 March 2020
HASHTAG
#osc2020

Pre-Event Barcamp Open Science

The Barcamp Open Science is a barcamp dedicated to the Open Science movement. It is open to everybody interested in discussing, learning more about, and sharing experiences on practices in Open Science. We would like to invite researchers and practitioners from various backgrounds to contribute their experience and ideas to the discussion.

Barcamp


Accepted Contributions

Overall, we received 60 submissions for the Call for Poster Presentations. Among the high amount of excellent abstracts, the programme committee decided to accept 20 abstracts for poster presentations. The best eight abstracts are additionally presented as short talks.

For the Call for Speakers we received 17 submissions. Among them the programme committee decided to invite the following six speakers:

  • Hugo Sven van Ewijk, Rathenau Instituut, Netherlands
  • Dr Johannes Fournier Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), Germany
  • Dr Emma Harris Training Developer and Project Manager | Communications Department and ORION Project, Germany
  • Dr Julia Stewart Lowndes National Center for Ecological Analysis & Synthesis, University of California Santa Barbara, USA
  • Dr August Wierling, Western Norway University of Applied Science, Norway

Accepted poster presentations


 
 
 
 

Programme (preliminary)

Expand All +
  • Day 1

    March 11, 2020

  • Open science is everyone’s business, no one can create the change, facilities or opportunities for open science alone. But who should steer the direction of open science? How should the different layers of activity and actors collaborate to enhance open science? What is the need for a political agenda in research?

  • Despite supporting the idea of open science, researchers may not participate because it is unclear how to implement it in their own work. At the same time, they are struggling with data analysis, which without formal training becomes an individual, slow, and lonely burden. There is great opportunity to welcome scientists to existing open data science tools and communities that can meet their immediate needs and also catalyze a more open culture in science. Openscapes does this by engaging, empowering, and amplifying scientists with open data science, focused on establishing open mindsets and resilient, collaborative data practices within research teams (Lowndes et al. 2019, Nature; openscapes.org). Building on experiences from the Ocean Health Index and the Openscapes Champions program, I will discuss how open science is at the core of working towards better and kinder science in less time, together.

  • Presentation of most outstanding submissions for the 'Call for Project Presentations'.

    1. Driving institutional change for open, responsible research and innovation
    Helene Brinken

    2. The INOS Project: Integrating Open and Citizen Science Into Active Learning Approaches in Higher Education
    Vasso Kalaitzi

    3. Scientific Culture Change from Above and Below at UBCO: Implementation of a Comprehensive Open Science Library Information Literacy Program for Undergraduates
    Sharon Hanna

    4. Perspectives on the Nature of Open Data in Business Cooperation:
    Seliina Päällysaho

  • Presentation of most outstanding submissions for the 'Call for Project Presentations'.

    5. Empowering next generation open scholarship with an open science fellows program
    Moritz Schubotz

    6. A platform for mainstreaming citizen science and open science in Europe
    Katherin Wagenknecht and Tim Woods

    7. TRIPLE: A European discovery platform for the SSH
    Peter Kraker

    8. A decentralized high-intensity approach to foster data management best-practices and publication of open research data
    Harald von Waldow

  • Poster presentation of all 20 accepted submissions for the 'Call for Project Presentations'
    the bold/underlined authors will present the posters at the conference

    Coffee will be served from 16:30 – 17:00

    1. Driving institutional change for open, responsible research and innovation
    Helene Brinken, Antonia Correia and Maxie Gottschling
    2. The INOS Project: Integrating Open and Citizen Science Into Active Learning Approaches in Higher Education
    Evangelia Triantafyllou, Katerina Zourou and Vasso Kalaitzi
    3. Scientific Culture Change from Above and Below: Implementation of a Comprehensive Open Science Library Information Literacy Program for Undergraduates
    Sharon Hanna
    4. Perspectives on the Nature of Open Data in Business Cooperation
    Seliina Päällysaho, Jaana Latvanen, Anne Kärki, Anttoni Lehto, Jaakko Riihimaa, Pekka Lahti, Hanna Lahtinen, Eija Suikkanen and Helena Puhakka-Tarvainen
    5. Empowering next generation open scholarship with an open science fellows program
    Christopher Schwarzkopf, Benedikt Fecher, Isabella Peters and Moritz Schubotz
    6. A platform for mainstreaming citizen science and open science in Europe
    N.N.
    7. TRIPLE: A European discovery platform for the SSH
    Peter Kraker and Judith Schulte
    8. A decentralized high-intensity approach to foster data management best-practices and publication of open research data
    Harald von Waldow
    9. Digital economy for Open Science
    Ann Shkor, Aliaksei Kulik, Alex Shkor and Artyom Ruseckiy
    10. Realizing the Potential of Research Data: Subjectification as a Precondition for Reuse
    Daniel Spichtinger and Marcel LaFlamme
    11. Supporting Disciplinary Research Data Management Practices to Generate FAIR and Open Data
    Sebastian Netscher, Anna Schwickerath, Reiner Mauer and Anja Perry
    12. Open Science (up)skilling and training programmes in Europe for researchers and academic libraries staff: from sketching the landscape with selective case-studies to sharing best practices
    Cecile Swiatek, Helene Brinken and Vasso Kalaitzi
    13. Catalyzing the Open Science Transformation by an Institutional Strategy
    Jochen Schirrwagen, Cord Wiljes, Christian Pietsch, Nils Hachmeister and Andreas Czerniak
    14. Leveraging Open Access publishing to fight fake news
    Sylvain Massip and Charles Letaillieur
    15. (Re)Building Trust? Investigating the effects of badges on perceived trustworthiness in journal articles
    Jürgen Schneider, Samuel Merk and Tom Rosman
    16. Sunlight is the best disinfectant: retractions and the role of open access
    Jasmin Schmitz
    17. Between utopia and dystopia lays the land of knowledge or how to stimulate societal discourse based on fact, not fear
    Luiza Dr. Bengtsson
    18. A FAIR and User-centred Infrastructure for Learning Resources
    Iacopo Vagliano, Tamara Heck, Sylvia Kullmann, Ahmed Saleh and Klaus Tochtermann
    19. Developing Open RDI and Education
    Anne Kärki, Kaisa Jaalama, Juhani Talvela, Anttoni Lehto, Seliina Päällysaho and Jaana Latvanen
    20. A Sustainable Scholar-led Model Without Publication Fees
    Paula Clemente Vega

  • Day 2

    March 12, 2020

  • In 2017, a European dialogue process led to the development of the so-called “Open Science Career Assessment Matrix” (OS-CAM). Taking the OS-CAM as a reference point, the working group “Scientific Practice” within the Alliance Initiative “Digital Information” wanted to know which open science practices are actually considered for the purpose of research assessment, which practices should eventually be considered as beneficial for advancing one’s career, and what kind of barriers one encounters when evaluating with regard to open science. Drawing on quantitative as well as qualitative information received by an online survey that led to nearly 400 responses, the presentation will highlight some interesting variations in the research community’s perception of these issues.

  • Open Science holds the promise to enhance science and society relationships by making scientific endeavours more inclusive, participatory, understandable, accessible and re-usable for audiences beyond the ivory towers of universities and research institutions. Equity is a key aim of Open Science, but could Open Science policies actually worsen existing inequalities? Open Science needs resources (funding, time, knowledge, skills), and the traditionally advantaged groups usually have more of them. Will their privilege mean that they are the ones to benefit most?

    The panel will focus on the impact of open science practices in academia, industry, and policy-making. It aims to engage researchers and Open Science practitioners who are often important gatekeepers as well as enablers for engagement in participatory research. Panellists will be asked to share their experiences with participatory processes and to reflect on possible barriers to and incentives for participation. Panellists will share their own experiences in facilitating research uptake (e.g. through participatory policy-making) and discuss the ways in which the voices of various stakeholders become effective.

    Questions to be addressed: How can Open Science help to foster the uptake of scientific expertise in academia, industry, and deliberative processes (policy-making)? What other factors might affect the uptake of research in and beyond academia? Will Open Science introduce new, unintended barriers and inequalities?

    Session Convenors: ON-MERRIT consortium
    The project ON-MERRIT (Observing and Negating Matthew Effects in Responsible Research & Innovation Transition) aims at contributing to an equitable scientific system that rewards researchers based on merit.

  • The ORION Open Science project has delivered nearly 40 different training workshops and events on Open Science for researchers and funders across Europe for over two years, and has recently created an online training course on Open Science in the Life Sciences. From the experience of doing this work the training team, based in Berlin at the Max-Delbrück-Center for Molecular Medicine, have gained several key insights into what works well for delivering effective Open Science training and revealing important lessons about what training methods are effective, and what areas researchers and research managers find challenging and engaging, and what workshop participants identify as next steps. In this talk these lessons would be presented and some of the key training methods shared. These include focusing on professional benefits, emphasising concrete but achievable next steps, and encouraging peer-to-peer learning.

 
 

Date and Location

11-12 March 2020

H4 Hotel
Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 32
10178 Berlin


Programme Committee

  • Thomas Köhler, Technical University Dresden
  • Stephanie Linek, Leibniz Information Centre for Economics (ZBW)
  • Peter Mutschke, GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences
  • Marc Rittberger, Leibniz Institute for Research and Information in Education (DIPF)
  • Klaus Tochtermann, Leibniz Information Centre for Economics (ZBW)
  • Andreas Witt, Institute for the German Language (IDS)